National News

March 15, 2013

10 Things to Know for Today

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about Friday:

1. THERE’S GOOD NEWS...

Cardinal Jorge Bergoglio was often a star speaker about economic inequities. He also warned church leaders about drifting from core Catholic beliefs.

2. ...AND BAD NEWS

Human rights activists differ on how much responsibility Pope Francis personally deserves for the Argentine church’s dark history of supporting a murderous dictatorship.

3. CAN WE CHARGE THEM A PENALTY?

The IRS says 660,000 refunds will be delayed by up to six weeks because of a software problem.

4. A SPOONFUL OF SUGAR...

Obama is signaling a willingness to adopt some modest steps on Medicare and Social Security. Democrats wince.

5. HOW BIG IS THE GALAXY (SCREEN)

The new version crams a 5-inch screen into body slightly smaller than the S III’s.

6. WHICH SIDE OF THE POND PUTS DOWN THEIR CELLPHONES

A significantly higher percentage of U.S. drivers report phone use behind the wheel than drivers in Europe, the CDC finds.

7. OH MY GOD! PARTICLE

In what could go down as one of the great Eureka! moments in physics, scientists say they are confident they have found a Higgs boson.

8. WHEN TO EXPECT A FINANCAL FIX IN DETROIT

The newly appointed emergency manger says “we can get this done significantly shorter than 18 months.”

9. WHY N.J.’S CHRISTIE IS ASKED TO APOLOGIZE

He referred to the state Assembly leader, Democratic Speaker Sheila Oliver, by her race and gender instead of her name.

10. JOURNALIST IMPLICATED IN ‘ANONYMOUS’ PLOT

A social media editor for Reuters is charged with conspiring with the hacking group to alter headlines of Los Angeles Times articles.

 

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