National News

April 3, 2013

In Colorado, Obama presses for gun measures

DENVER — Ratcheting up pressure for Congress to limit access to guns, President Barack Obama said Wednesday that steps taken recently by Colorado to tighten its gun laws show “there doesn’t have to be a conflict” between keeping citizens safe and protecting Second Amendment rights to gun ownership.

“I believe there’s no conflict between reconciling these realities,” Obama said in remarks prepared for delivery in Denver, where he planned to step up his call for background checks for all gun purchases and renew his demand that Congress at least vote on banning assault weapons and limiting access to large-capacity ammunition magazines.

“There doesn’t have to be a conflict between protecting our citizens and protecting our Second Amendment rights,” he said, noting that it’s been just over 100 days since the gun rampage that killed 20 first-graders and six adults at an elementary school in Newtown, Conn.

In danger of losing congressional momentum on the issue, Obama was appearing in Colorado — which has a deep-rooted hunting tradition and where gun ownership is a cherished right — to highlight steps the state has taken to tighten gun laws. His intent is to use Colorado’s example and public pressure to prod reluctant members of Congress to act.

Colorado recently expanded background checks for gun purchases and placed restrictions on ammunition magazines. Prospects for getting Congress to pass similar measures appear bleak.

“I think that Colorado has shown that practical progress is possible by enacting tougher background checks that won’t infringe on the rights of responsible gun owners, but will help keep guns out of the hands of dangerous people,” Obama said.

In Denver, Obama was meeting with law enforcement officials and community leaders at the Denver Police Academy, not far from the Aurora suburb where a gunman last summer killed 12 people in a movie theater. Prosecutors are seeking the death penalty for James Holmes, accused of carrying out the Aurora rampage.

Among those participating in the Denver discussion with Obama was Sandy Phillips, the mother of Jessica Redfield Ghawi, 24, who died in the Aurora shooting. She conceded that gun control is a difficult issue, and said she has spoken to numerous lawmakers in Washington who “want to do the right thing without it costing their jobs.”

She said she is counting on Obama to press the issue.

“We need to have universal background checks for every sale, that’s a minimum,” she said in an interview before the meeting. “I hope he keeps pushing for the assault weapons ban and I hope he keeps pushing for magazine restrictions.”

With Congress due to return to Washington after a two-week Easter break, Obama has been scheduling high-profile events on gun legislation to push lawmakers and sustain a drive for some kind of action aimed at curbing gun violence more than three months after the massacre at Sandy Hook Elementary School in Newtown, Conn.

Last week, he called for legislation while flanked by 21 mothers who lost children to gun violence. “I haven’t forgotten those kids,” he declared then.

The Senate could begin debating gun control legislation next week.

On Monday, Obama was visiting Hartford, Conn., where state lawmakers have announced a bipartisan agreement on gun legislation in response to the Newtown shooting.

“If it were simple to pass measures through Congress that are very common sense but would reduce gun violence in America, those measures would have passed already,” White House spokesman Jay Carney said Tuesday. “And the president has always recognized that this is something that would be a challenge.”

In selecting Colorado, Obama is showcasing a state with a long centrist tradition that prizes its Western frontier heritage. But an influx of young coastal transplants and growing Hispanic voter clout have helped Democrats win a string of victories in the state. Even before the Sandy Hook massacre energized gun control proponents, Democratic Gov. John Hickenlooper said he was open to new gun control measures in the state.

Colorado Republicans fought the new legislation, contending that Democrats overreached and will be punished by voters in November. Several county sheriffs have vowed not to enforce the new gun restrictions. Democrats contend that the measures are generally popular, especially among the suburban women who decide Colorado elections.

Obama’s trip comes a day after a study commissioned by the National Rifle Association, which opposes Obama’s gun control measures, recommended that schools have trained, armed staffers to increase security for students. The American Federation of Teachers denounced the proposal.

There were signs that sweeping congressional efforts to address gun violence have flagged.

Key senators have been unable to reach a bipartisan compromise that would require federal background checks for gun transactions between private individuals. Federal background checks currently apply only to sales handled by licensed gun dealers.

After the Denver stop, Obama will travel to San Francisco to attend fundraisers Wednesday and Thursday for Democratic Party organizations.

———

Associated Press writers Nicholas Riccardi in Denver and Alan Fram in Washington contributed to this report.

 

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