National News

April 11, 2013

100 dead animals discovered at Indiana farm

SUMMITVILLE, Ind. — Health officials were called to a farm and discovered a sitution they described as a place where humanity and compassion didn’t exist.

More than a hundred animals were found dead and rotting on a farm and the roughly 30 animals still living were described as “walking carcasses.”

“This goes beyond caring about animals,” said Maleah Stringer, president of the Madison County (Ind.) Animal Protection League. “This for me, is about humanity, compassion. And I don’t find that here.”

The farm, which is owned by Daniel W. and Carrie Ault, was located about 25 miles north of Anderson in Madison County. A Hazmat team was called to begin clearing away dead animals.

The living animals include eight horses, six sheep, two ponies, a llama and several chickens, ducks, turkeys and rabbits. All of them, Richardson said, are malnourished and in “pretty bad shape.”

Daniel Ault reportedly said he’d been “overwhelmed” with running the farm and helping with the Strawtown Animal Auction and a meat-packing business he owned in Grant County.

“I can’t speak to what his mindset is,” Stringer said. “When you’re throwing animals in buckets and allowing other creatures to live, sleep, eat, among the dead, that to me speaks a little bit more than overwhelmed.”

He said it’s possible that the scene went unnoticed for a period of time because of the cold weather, but with a warming trend in recent days, the stench reaches far beyond the borders of the property.

Daniel Ault has past animal-related citations from 2010 in Hamilton County for public nuisance and animal neglect.

But “they weren’t even close to this,” said Hamilton County Deputy Animal Control Coordinator Tom Rogers.

Detais for this story were provided by The Herald Bulletin in Anderson, Ind.

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