National News

July 25, 2013

10 Things to Know for Today

Your daily look at late-breaking news, upcoming events and the stories that will be talked about today:

1. HOUSE REJECTS CHALLENGE TO NSA SURVEILLANCE

After a fierce debate and a narrow vote, the government can keep collecting hundreds of millions of Americans’ phone records.

2. TRAIN DERAILS, KILLING AT LEAST 35

One survivor says the passenger train in northwestern Spain was traveling at high speed and rounding a curve when it jumped the tracks.

3. POPE CONSOLES THE LOWLY

His session with drug addicts in Brazil is meant to drive home the message that the church must focus on the poor and those who are suffering.

4. WHERE NSA LEAKER HOPES TO STAY

At least for now, Snowden wants to remain in Russia, studying its language and culture, his lawyer says.

5. ENDANGERED: DOOR-TO-DOOR MAIL DELIVERY

The service could be virtually phased out by 2022 in the U.S. under a cost-cutting proposal before a House panel.

6. WILL AND KATE PICK A NAME

The royal couple’s newborn son will be called George Alexander Louis — and be known as “His Royal Highness Prince George of Cambridge.”

7. WEINER PRESSES ON

“This is not about me” but about voters, the disgraced pol says in response to calls that he abandon his campaign for NYC mayor.

8. HOW FACEBOOK SURPRISED INVESTORS

Buoyed by higher revenue from mobile ads, the social network delivers strong second-quarter profits.

9. LITTLE VIOLENCE, BUT LOTS OF TWEETS

Fears of widespread unrest after the Trayvon Martin verdict proved unfounded. Some experts credit the modern ability to create change through activism and social media.

10. WHO COULD BE THE NEXT AMBASSADOR TO JAPAN

If confirmed, Caroline Kennedy would be the first woman in a post where many other prominent Americans have served to strengthen a vital Asian tie.

 

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