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November 16, 2013

10 Things to Know: This Week’s Takeaways

Looking back at the stories to remember from this week:

1. PHILIPPINES STRUGGLES IN AFTERMATH OF TYPHOON

The widespread destruction caused by one of the most powerful storms on record became clear this week, with more than 3,600 dead and 600,000 homeless. After days of logistical bottlenecks, a massive aid effort was finally reaching the victims.

2. IN A REVERSAL, OBAMA TO ALLOW RENEWAL OF CANCELED HEALTH PLANS  

Under pressure from consumers and fellow Democrats, he said the administration no longer would require insurance companies to jettison current individual and small group plans that fall short of minimum coverage standards under the health care law.

3. CHINA TO EASE ONE-CHILD POLICY, ABOLISH LABOR CAMPS

The country’s leaders addressed the deeply unpopular programs at a time when the Communist Party feels increasingly alienated from the public.

4. MEDICAL ORGANIZATIONS URGE DOCTORS TO GET TOUGHER WITH PATIENTS ABOUT OBESITY

U.S. doctors are being told to calculate a patient’s body mass index and — if needed — come up with a weight-loss plan that includes counseling.

5. FEDERAL RESERVE NOMINEE STANDS BY LOW INTEREST RATE POLICIES

Janet Yellen said in testimony before the Senate Banking Committee, which is considering her for the job of Fed chairman, that the U.S. economy has regained the ground it lost in the Great Recession.

6. BOSTON CRIME BOSS JAMES ‘WHITEY’ BULGER SENTENCED TO LIFE IN PRISON

The 84-year-old gangster was found guilty in 11 of the 19 killings he was accused of, along with dozens of other gangland crimes, including shakedowns and money-laundering. He sat stone-faced as a judge castigated him for his “almost unfathomable” depravity.

7. ARCHITECTS’ PANEL RECOGNIZES ONE WORLD TRADE CENTER AS TALLEST BUILDING IN U.S.

The 1,451-foot Willis Tower in Chicago is being dethroned by the New York skyscraper. Including its 408-foot needle, it is 1,776 feet tall and rises on the site of the twin towers that were destroyed in the 9/11 terrorist attack.

8. 5-YEAR-OLD LEUKEMIA PATIENT BECOMES ‘BATKID’ TO SAVE SAN FRANCISCO

With the help of the Make-A-Wish Foundation and thousands of people in the city, Miles Scott — aka Batkid — became a superhero for a day. He dressed in a Batman costume, helped a damsel in distress and foiled a robbery by the Riddler.

9. AFTER 150 YEARS, NEWSPAPER ‘REGRETS THE ERROR’ ON GETTYSBURG ADDRESS

The Patriot-News of Harrisburg says it’s sorry that it didn’t recognize the greatness of President Abraham Lincoln’s oratory at the time it was delivered. The newspaper says the coverage by its predecessor, The Harrisburg Patriot & Union, failed to see the speech’s “momentous importance, timeless eloquence and lasting significance.”

10. HOME OF THE ATLANTA BRAVES SEEMS HEADED FOR EXTINCTION

Turner Field opened as the Olympic stadium for the 1996 Summer Games and then was converted for baseball the next year. But the Braves said they are moving out in 2017 to a new $672 million ballpark in suburban Cobb County.

 

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