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July 15, 2013

10 Things to Know for Tuesday

1. HOW SOME IN SANFORD, FLA., VIEW THE VERDICT

“We don’t necessarily have to like it, but we have to respect it,” says Venitta Robinson, a black resident of the city where Trayvon Martin was slain.

2. CIVIL RIGHTS CASE WOULD FACE A HIGH BAR

“You’d have to prove that George Zimmerman was seeking out to commit the crime against Trayvon Martin, specifically because he was African-American,” one legal expert says.

3. INFIGHTING WEAKENS SYRIAN OPPOSITION

Al-Qaida fighters clash with more moderate rebel groups, who accuse the extremists of trying to seize control of the rebellion.

4. WHAT’S AT STAKE IN LATEST SENATE DUST-UP

Changes pushed by Democrats would make the Senate similar to the House, where the majority rules and the minority party enjoys little leverage.

5. IRAN’S NEW FAVORITE GUESSING GAME

Speculation about what Ahmadinejad will do next is rampant. Some are betting that the outgoing president will become a media boss.

6. THAT DAILY GRIND MAY HELP SHARPEN YOUR MIND

People who delay retirement have less risk of developing Alzheimer’s or other types of dementia, a study finds.

7. WHO’S FACING OFF OVER MINIMUM WAGE

Wal-Mart is battling efforts by Washington, D.C., to force big-box stores to pay workers at least $12.50 an hour.  

8. ‘IT’S AN ABSOLUTE MIRACLE THIS CHILD SURVIVED’

A 6-year-old boy who sank 11 feet into a Lake Michigan sand dune regains consciousness after his rescue some three hours later.

9. WHAT FAMILIAR TREAT IS SMALLER, BUT LASTS LONGER

A new bakery brings Twinkies back to store shelves: The spongy cakes now weigh less, with a shelf life of more than 6 weeks.

10. ON DECK AT ALL-STAR GAME: YOUNG TALENT

Mike Trout, Manny Machado and Bryce Harper are among a wave of skilled, youthful players changing the makeup of the Big Leagues.

 

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