Daily Updates

March 11, 2013

How people move things with their minds

(Continued)

TEMPE, Ariz. —

It's fairly safe to say that EEG headsets won't be turning us into cyborgs anytime soon. But it would be a mistake to assume that we can predict today how brain-computer interface technology will evolve. Just last month, a team at Brown University unveiled a prototype of a low-power, wireless neural implant that can transmit signals to a computer over broadband. That could be a major step forward in someday making BCIs practical for everyday use. Meanwhile, researchers at Cornell last week revealed that they were able to use fMRI, a measure of brain activity, to detect which of four people a research subject was thinking about at a given time. Machines today can read our minds in only the most rudimentary ways. But such advances hint that they may be able to detect and respond to more abstract types of mental activity in the always-changing future.

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Oremus is the lead blogger for Future Tense, reporting on emerging technologies, tech policy and digital culture.

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