June 30, 2013

Letter: Choose your own scandal


— A few months ago I noted the likelihood that gun control would be an immediate issue and that gun owners should be cautious about a knee-jerk reaction to the Sandy Hook massacre. Many folks ran to the buy-back collection points like metal to a magnet. Not everyone. Some brave souls kept their guns and bought more, for a rainy day I suppose!

This time I’m taking on a different challenge. Be cautious about which scandal you choose, it just may be the one the promoters want you to choose. No way to know how deep the river of corruption runs in politics. We can’t doubt that layers of cover-up keep us in the dark while the tides of self-interest among the political elite keep flowing. The IRS, The Associated Press and Internet discussions are running rampant, or they were, until the issue of the CIA top secret information leak hit the air waves. Forget Benghazi, Fast & Furious along with other lies.

Now we have the magic wand that moves the whole discussion, the leak that will attract attention away from other scandals along with the illegal immigration debates. We have a whole new topic of CIA secret leaks that take precedence over any other matters having to do with politicians, department heads of various agencies and public storytellers; those who knew or should have known she was lying about the Benghazi terrorist attack. Or IRS scandal.

With only a week or so beyond the IRS challenge at least one politician claims that the issue is a moot subject already. Numerous politicians have shushed the Fast and Furious issue as if the life of a patrol agent isn’t worth the effort to criminally charge the individuals responsible. Benghazi, being currently under siege by terrorists, gets mentioned briefly but with far less emphasis than it deserves. After all, only four Americans were lost in that 9/11.

Notice that I’ve left the personal privacy issue to last. This one is dear to my heart from the First Amendment rights, U.S. Constitution. What I say in private is my choice and decision. What I say in person or in private has no business being broadcast to the world by “cyberphone.” In the Fourth Amendment I am supposed to be secure in my abode against undue search and seizure. To those who swear to uphold it: Do it!    



Lawrence Headrick

Tunnel Hill